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SCHOOL OF HOPS

BEER STYLES GUIDE

Pale Ale

Different brewing practices and hop levels have resulted in a range of tastes.

Pale Ale is a beer style brewed with predominantly pale malts to produce a brew that balances malt and hop flavours unlike the more hop-forward IPA style. Another example of a traditional British beer style taken to the next level by US brewers, Pale Ales are flavourful and versatile, pairing wonderfully with various foods. Pale Ales come in many forms, hail from countless countries, and feature various hops and ingredient adjuncts.

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INDIA PALE ALE

IPAs are all about hop flavour, aroma and bitterness.

Originally a classic English Style, US craft breweries resurrected the style and introduced complex flavours, higher ABVs and the spirit of experimentation – what was once a historical relic, has quickly become a distinctly contemporary tipple. Expect floral, fruity, citrus and pine notes from the now ubiquitous style. Often defined as West Coast (dank, resinous and bitter) or East Coast (soft, juicy and bearing little bitterness) in style.

PILSNER

Crisp, clean and refreshing.

A Pilsner showcases the finest quality malt and hops. Crisp, clean and refreshing, straw to light gold in appearance with brilliant clear clarity and a creamy long lasting head. Pilsners are an easy-drinking favourite amongst brewers due their delicate flavours. 

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PORTER

Originating in London 300 years ago.

A moderate-strength brown beer with a restrained roasty character and bitterness. May have a range of roasted flavours, generally without burnt qualities, and often has a chocolate-caramel-malty profile. Porter became a highly-popular, widely-exported style in the 1800s before declining around World War 1 and disappearing in the 1950s. It was re-introduced in the 1970s with the emergeance of the craft beer movement. 

SWEET STOUT

MOST ARE MADE USING MILK SUGARS KNOWN AS LACTOSE

A very dark, sweet, full-bodied, sometimes with coffee and/or chocolate notes. Fruitiness can be low to moderately high. Hop bitterness is moderate and a medium to high sweetness provides a counterpoint to roasted character and hop bitterness. Most are made using lactose/milk sugars. These sugars aren't very sweet however, and our fussy yeast won't eat this type of sugar, so the sweetness of the beer is increased. 

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IRISH STOUT

Created to capitalise on the Porter craze in the late 1700s.

Pronounced roasted flavour, often similar to coffee and dark chocolate with some malty complexity. The level of bitterness is somewhat variable, as is the roasted character and the dryness of the finish. Hop character is usually non-existent. Traditionally served in a tulip pint glass and often associated with a nitro dispense. 

IMPERIAL STOUT

Said to have been popular with the Russian Imperial Court.

Intensely flavoured, strong, jet black deliciousness. Rich, deep, complex and frequently intense with a higher ABV around 8-12%. Bittersweet or unsweetened chocolate, cocoa and coffee. The finish has an alcohol warming much more noticeable that lower ABV Stouts. If stored, a vinous or port-ike quality can develop with age. 

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SAISON

A 'farmhouse' ale originating from Belgium, brewed for farmers to drink during the hot farming season.

A characteristic dry finish essential to the style means a Saison should never finish sweet. The balance is towards fruity, spicy and hoppy and any bitterness or sourness should not overwhelm these flavours. Hop flavour is low to moderate, and generally spicy or earthy in character. Herbs and spices are optional additions and should never detract from the yeart character. 

SOUR

Spontaneous fermentation and packed with good bacteria.

There are many different varieties of Sours. Lambic, GoseGeuze and Berliner Weisse are just some examples of sour craft beer styles that you can find. Your taste buds are in for a surprise with this distinctly different type of beer. Wild yeast strains and bacteria help sour the beer and gift a “funky” flavour. This is a great entry beer style for wine and cider lovers who will find the beer refreshingly tart and dry. 

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BARLEYWINE

Usually the strongest ale from a brewery and associated with winter.

Light amber to medium copper in appearance but beer as as dark as light brown are acceptable. Rich malt flavour with noticeable hop flavour and bitterness. The finish may be sweet to dry depending on the age of the beer. Hop bitterness can range from moderate to quite aggressive. Noticeable alcohol prensence resulting from a higher ABV of around 8-12%. 

MORE COMING SOON

WE'LL KEEP ADDING MORE BEER STYLEs UNTIL WE'VE GOT EVERYTHING COVERED!

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